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THE RITZ-CARLTON RESIDENCES, MIAMI BEACH UNVEILS FIRST-EVER RESIDENTIAL ART STUDIO

Forget million-dollar art on the walls, The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach is unveiling an art studio—the first one in the world in a residential development and the first one by Piero Lissoni, the iconic Italian architect and designer.

Buyers will be able to connect with their inner Picasso—Pablo or Paloma—in the Art Studio, which may include easels for painting, wall space for canvases, a stone surface for sculpting, a table for jewelry making and beading as well as a working sink. There is also a wall of light that imitates north faced natural light, which is optimum for art, 24/7. Additionally, the space will boast a library filled with art books for inspiration.

“I liked the idea of having a simple and calm space. A quiet room to create,” said Lissoni.

Miami artist and sculptor Tatiana Blanco, who advised Lissoni on the working elements for the Art Studio, envisions the space will inspire people to express themselves. “Many people say ‘I used to do art, and I don’t have time anymore.’ Having an art studio in your building is like having a gym downstairs. No more excuses.”

“Condominium developments have media and gaming rooms but no rooms for artistic expression,” noted Ricardo Dunin, founding partner, Lionheart Capital, the developer of The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach, which is now more than 50 percent sold at prices that range from $2 million to $40 million for the Lissoni-designed condominium residences and single-family villas. “There is a need in society now for more hands-on creative work. You don’t have to be a professional artist to do art, the same way you don’t have to be a professional basketball player to play basketball,” continued Dunin.

Residents will also have the opportunity to draw inspiration from The Residences’ seven acres of tropically-landscaped gardens, pools and private boat dockages set on a quiet corner where lake, ocean and waterway meet.

Art Studio programming will include private and group classes, art talks and trips, and onsite exhibits of residents’ work.

“Art is good for the mind on the subconscious level,” continued Blanco. “People will do art if the set up is there, and it is easy.”

“Art is like therapy,” added Dunin. “Everyone needs an outlet.”